Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Looking for colour 3

click photo to enlarge
It's that time of year again, the time when, after months of darkness, cold and overcast skies, the days start to lengthen, the first signs of spring appear, and I get the urge to produce photographs that are bright and colourful. But the fact is, the colour still isn't there in great abundance, though it is now starting to appear.

On my circuit of the garden I found wych hazel (yellow) in full flower, small branches full of blooms (purple) on the Daphne mezereum, the heathers in flower (white and purple), the odd primula struggling into bloom (red, yellow), some pansies (purple) and the winter jasmine doing its best (yellow). Oh, and the snowdrops were also opening (white). If that sounds like a profusion of colour it isn't because most of these are small plants, producing small blooms in small numbers.

During my perambulation I took a few shots of the flowers but my attention was diverted from them by the subject of today's photograph. My eye was drawn to the brilliant orange/red of this solitary ladybird sitting on the leaf of a sage plant. I've seen quite a few of these insects recently, slow moving, apparently aimless, looking like they've woken from a deep slumber. This one was no different from the others except it was completely immobile. The attraction from a photographic point of view was the deep point of colour against the grey/blue/green of the sage and the brown of the earth and fallen leaves.

Why the title "Looking for colour 3"? Because in 2009, towards the end of February, I blogged on the same theme, using the same title, over two posts. See here and here.

photograph and text (c) T. Boughen

Camera: Canon
Mode: Aperture Priority
Focal Length: 100mm
F No: f6.3
Shutter Speed: 1/80
ISO: 1600
Exposure Compensation: 0 EV
Image Stabilisation: On

2 comments:

Peter Davidson said...

Simple yet very effective picture with a good use of colour. Nicely seen and just a few steps from a warm house and a cup of tea! Perfect.

Tony Boughen said...

Thanks Peter. Interestingly this was shot on one of those very windy day that we had recently, but this plant was in a sheltered spot and the sharpness of the full-size image is pretty good.

Regards,
Tony